Great Courses Lectures

THE GREAT COURSES
The Fall and Rise of China
The Fall and Rise of China

2 weekly lectures 
24 weeks / 60 minutes

Wednesdays at 12:00 P.M.
Obert Meeting Room

“Modern China has been a source of endless fascination, sometimes evoking feelings of profound admiration, while at other times leaving me feeling bitterly frustrated and outraged. One thing that China has never been, is boring.”
-Professor Richard Baum, Ph. D.
August 7, 2019
1 The Splendor That Was China, 600—1700 
2 Malthus and Manchu Hubris, 1730—1800


August 14, 2019

3 Barbarians at the Gate, 1800—1860
4 Rural Misery and Rebellion, 1842—1860


August 21, 2019

5 The Self-Strengthening Movement, 1860—1890
6 Hundred Days of Reform and the Boxer Uprising


August 28, 2019
7 The End of Empire, 1900—1911
8 The Failed Republic, 1912—1919


September 4, 2019

9 The Birth of Chinese Communism, 1917—1925
10 Chiang, Mao, and Civil War, 1926—1934


September 11, 2019

11 The Republican Experiment, 1927—1937
12 “Resist Japan!” 1937—1945


September 18, 2019

13 Chiang’s Last Stand, 1945—1949
14 “The Chinese People Have Stood Up!”


September 25, 2019

15 Korea, Taiwan, and the Cold War, 1950—1954
16 Socialist Transformation, 1953—1957

October 2, 2018
17 Cracks in the Monolith, 1957—1958
18 The Great Leap Forward, 1959—1962


October 9, 2019

19 Demise of the Great Leap Forward 1959—1962
20 Never Forget Class Struggle! 1962—1965

October 16, 2019
21 “Long Live Chairman Mao!” 1964—1965
22 Mao’s Last Revolution Begins, 1965—1966


October 23, 2019

23 The Children’s Crusade, 1966—1967
24 The Storm Subsides, 1968—1969


October 30, 2019
25 The Sino-Soviet War of Nerves, 1964—1969
26 Nixon, Kissinger, and China 1969—1972


November 6, 2019
27 Mao’s Deterioration and Death, 1971—1976
28 The Legacy of Mao Zedong—An Appraisal


November 13, 2019

29 The Post-Mao Interregnum, 1976—1977
30 Hua Guofeng and the Four Modernizations

November 20, 2019
31 Dent Takes Command, 1978—1979
32 The Historic Third Plenum, 1978


November 27, 2019

33 The “Normalization” of U.S.-China Relations
34 Deng Consolidates His Power 1979—1980


December 4, 2019
35 Socialist Democracy and the Rule of Law
36 Burying Mao, 1981—1983


December 11, 2019
37 “To Get Rich is Glorious,” 1982—1986
38 The Fault Lines of Reform, 1984—1987

December 18, 2019

39 The Road to Tiananmen, 1987—1989
40 The Empire Strikes Back, 1989


January 8, 2019
41 After the Deluge, 1989—1992
42 The “Roaring Nineties,” 1992—1999

January 15, 2019

43 The Rise of Chinese Nationalism, 1993—2001
44 China’s Lost Territories—Taiwan, Hong Kong


January 22, 2019

45 China in the New Millennium, 2000-2008
46 China’s Information Revolution

January 29, 2019
47 “One World, One Dream”—The 2008 Olympics
48 China’s Rise—The Sleeping Giant Stirs


TheGreatTours
The Great Tours

2 weekly lectures 
18 weeks / 60 minutes

Wednesdays at 12:00 P.M.
Obert Meeting Room

“Nostalgia is the enemy of history. ‘Downton Abbey’ is great fun but it’s not history. If seeing or reading something historical makes you feel warm and cozy, it’s probably very inaccurate.”
-Professor Patrick N. Allitt, Ph. D.
February 5, 2020
1 Welcome to Britain 
2 Prehistoric Britain

February 12, 2020

3 Roman Britain
4 Anglo-Saxon and Viking Britain

February 19, 2020

5 Britain’s Medieval Castles
6 Britain’s Medieval Cathedrals

February 26, 2020

7 Tudor Britain
8 Magna Carta and Civil War

March 4, 2020

9 Enlightenment Britain
10 Industrial Britain

March 11, 2020

11 Victorian Britain
12 20th Century Britain

March 18, 2020

13 Edinburgh and Glasgow
14 Wild Scotland: Beyond Edinburgh and Glasgow

March 25, 2020
15 North Wales
16 Cardiff and South Wales

April 1, 2020
17 The North of England
18 The English Midlands
April 8, 2020
19 East Anglia
20 England’s West Country

April 15, 2020
21 The Museums of London
22 London’s Streets and Parks

April 22, 2020
23 Buckingham Palace and Parliament
24 Oxford and Cambridge

May 6, 2020

25 Literary Britain: Chaucer and Shakespeare
26 Literary Britain: The Romantics

May 13, 2020
27 Literary Britain: Poets and Novelists
28 Literary Britain: The 20th Century

May 20, 2020

29 Artistic Britain: Painters and Sculptors
30 Britain’s Estates and Gardens

May 27, 2020
31 Legacy of the British Empire
32 Seafaring Britain

June 3, 2020
33 Britain’s War Memorials
34 Hiking England, Scotland, and Wales

June 10, 2020
35 Britain’s Sporting Tradition
36 How to Think About Visiting Britain

Professor Patrick N. Allitt, Ph. D.
Prof.
Dr. Patrick N. Allitt is Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University, where he has taught since 1988. The holder of a doctorate in history from the University of California, Berkeley, Professor Allitt-an Oxford University graduate-has also taught American religious history at Harvard Divinity School, where he was a Henry Luce Postdoctoral Fellow. He was the Director of Emory College's Center for Teaching and Curriculum from 2004 to 2009, where he looked for ways to improve teaching. In this critical administrative position, he led workshops on a wide variety of teaching-related problems, visited dozens of other professors' classes, and provided one-on-one consultation to teachers to help them overcome particular pedagogical problems. Professor Allitt was honored with Emory's Excellence in Teaching Award and in 2000 was appointed to the N.E.H./Arthur Blank Professorship of Teaching in the Humanities. A widely published and award-winning author, Professor Allitt has written several books, including The Conservatives: Ideas and Personalities throughout American History; Catholic Intellectuals and Conservative Politics in America, 1950-1985; Catholic Converts: British and American Intellectuals Turn to Rome

and Religion in America since 1945: A History. He is also author of I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom, a memoir about one semester in his life as a university professor. In addition, he is the editor of Major Problems in American Religious History. He has written numerous articles and reviews for academic and popular journals, including The New York Times Book Review.